Monday, July 28, 2014

Green Living: What can you do to reduce carbon emissions?

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U.S. Carbon Dioxide Gas Emissions, 1990-2012
Line graph that shows the U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2012. In 1990 carbon dioxide emissions started around 5,000 million metric tons. The emissions rose to about 6,000 million metric tons in 2000 where it remained until about 2008 when it began to decline. By 2009, the carbon dioxide emissions were at about 5,500 million metric tons, followed by a slight recovering in 2010 to about 5,700 million metric tons and a decrease in 2012 to about 5,400 million metric tons.
Note: All emission estimates from the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2012.

Going forward, CO2 emissions in the United States are projected to grow by about 1.5% between 2005 and 2020. 
I have written a number of articles on green living  -  from Green Roofs, to what it means to be Leed Certified, to why it's in your best interest to buy more efficient windows even if they are more expensive.  I thought this article for the EPA site was pretty interesting.  

With all this talk about green house gases, how the US puts out the largest amount of green house gases, I was wondering if we were making any real progress.  I like the graph above that shows that we actually started to decrease our carbon output but it from looks of the comment about how we will still increase carbon output by about 1.5% by 2010, it sounds like we cut the easy stuff.  

What can you do to reduce, your carbon footprint?  If you live in Hoboken, JC or other parts of Hudson County, you are a step ahead.  Most of us here commute by public transportation or walk.  We also have Zip and Hertz Connect programs that allow people to share cars.  We can walk to the grocery store and many other places.  Recycling seems ingrained at least where I live but what else is there?  See below for more information on trends and what you can do.
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the United States increased by about 5% between 1990 and 2012. Since the combustion of fossil fuel is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, changes in emissions from fossil fuel combustion have historically been the dominant factor affecting total U.S. emission trends. Changes in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion are influenced by many long-term and short-term factors, including population growth, economic growth, changing energy prices, new technologies, changing behavior, and seasonal temperatures. Between 1990 and 2012, the increase in CO2 emissions corresponded with increased energy use by an expanding economy and population, and an overall growth in emissions from electricity generation. Transportation emissions also contributed to the 5% increase, largely due to an increase in miles traveled by motor vehicles.

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions

The most effective way to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is to reduce fossil fuel consumption. Many strategies for reducing CO2 emissions from energy are cross-cutting and apply to homes, businesses, industry, and transportation.
Examples of Reduction Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide
StrategyExamples of How Emissions Can be Reduced
Energy Efficiency
Improving the insulation of buildings, traveling in more fuel-efficient vehicles, and using more efficient electrical appliances are all ways to reduce energy consumption, and thus CO2 emissions.
  • See EPA's ENERGY STAR® program for more information on energy-efficient appliances.
  • See EPA's and DOE's fueleconomy.gov site for more information on fuel-efficient vehicles. 
  • Use rental car programs like Zip Cars or Hertz Connect.
  • Live within walking distance to work or take public transportation.
  • Learn about EPA's motor vehicle standards that improve vehicle efficiency and save drivers money.
Energy Conservation
Reducing personal energy use by turning off lights and electronics when not in use reduces electricity demand. Reducing distance traveled in vehicles reduces petroleum consumption. Both are ways to reduce energy CO2 emissions through conservation.
Learn more about What You Can Do at Home, at School, in the Office, and on the Road to save energy and reduce your carbon footprint.
Fuel Switching
Producing more energy from renewable sources and using fuels with lower carbon contents are ways to reduce carbon emissions.
Carbon Capture and Sequestration
Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration is a set of technologies that can potentially greatly reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO2Learn more.
*Carbon dioxide's lifetime is poorly defined because the gas is not destroyed over time, but instead moves among different parts of the ocean–atmosphere–land system. Some of the excess carbon dioxide will be absorbed quickly (for example, by the ocean surface), but some will remain in the atmosphere for thousands of years, due in part to the very slow process by which carbon is transferred to ocean sediments.
How to reduce Carbon Emissions at Home?

1. Change five lights

Replace your five most frequently used light fixtures or the lightbulbs in them withENERGY STAR® qualified products and you will help the environment while saving $70 a year on energy bills. ENERGY STAR lighting provides bright, warm light; generates 75% less heat; uses about 75% less energy than standard lighting; and lasts from 10 to 50 times longer.

2. Look for ENERGY STAR

When buying new products for your home, look for EPA's ENERGY STAR label to help you make the most energy-efficient decision. You can find the ENERGY STARlabel on more than 60 kinds of products, including appliances, lighting, heating and cooling equipment, electronics, and office equipment. Over their lifetime, products in your home that have earned the ENERGY STAR label can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 130,000 pounds and save you $11,000 on energy bills.

3. Heat and cool smartly

Heating and cooling accounts for almost half your energy bill--about $1,000 a year! There is a lot you can do to drive down this cost. Simple steps like changing air filters regularly, properly using a programmable thermostat, and having your heating and cooling equipment maintained annually by a licensed contractor can save energy and increase comfort, while helping to protect the environment. Depending on where you live, you can cut your annual energy bill by more than $200 by replacing your old heating and cooling equipment with ENERGY STAR-qualified equipment.

4. Seal and insulate your home

Reduce air leaks and stop drafts by using caulk, weather stripping, and insulation to seal your home's envelope and add more insulation to your attic to block out heat and cold. A knowledgeable homeowner or skilled contractor can save up to 20% on heating and cooling costs and significantly enhance home comfort with comprehensive sealing and insulating measures.


5. Reduce, reuse, recycle

Reducing, reusing, and recycling in your home helps conserve energy and reduces pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from resource extraction, manufacturing, and disposal. If there is a recycling program in your community, recycle your newspapers, beverage containers, paper, and other goods. Also, composting your food and yard waste reduces the amount of garbage that you send to landfills and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Visit EPA's Individual WAste Reduction Model (iWARM) to learn about the energy benefits of recycling, rather than landfilling, common waste products.

6. Use water efficiently

It takes lots of energy to pump, treat, and heat water, so saving water reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Saving water around the home is simple. Three percent of the nation's energy is used to pump and treat water so conserving water conserves energy that reduces greenhouse gas pollution. Reduce the amount of waste you generate and the water you consume whenever possible. Pursue simple water-saving actions such as not letting the water run while shaving or brushing teeth and save money while conserving water by using products with the WaterSense label. Did you know a leaky toilet can waste 200 gallons of water per day? Repair all toilet and faucet leaks right away. Running your dishwasher only with a full load can save 100 pounds of carbon dioxide and $40 per year. Be smart when irrigating your lawn or landscape. Only water when needed, and do it during the coolest part of the day; early morning is best. See EPA's WaterSense site for more water saving tips.

7. Be green in your yard

Composting your food and yard waste reduces the amount of garbage that you send to landfills and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. EPA's GreenScapes program provides tips on how to improve your lawn or garden while also helping the environment.


Power your home by purchasing green power.
 Green power is environmentally friendly electricity that is generated from renewable energy sources such as wind and the sun. There are two ways to use green power: You can buy green power, or you can modify your house to generate your own green power.Buying green power is easy. It offers a number of environmental and economic benefits over conventional electricity, including lower greenhouse gas emissions, and it helps increase clean energy supply. There are a number of steps you can take to create a greener home Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer , including installing solar panels Exit EPA Disclaimer and researching incentives for renewable energy in your state Exit EPA Disclaimer 8. Purchase green power


9. Calculate your household's carbon footprint

Use EPA's Household Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator to estimate your household greenhouse gas emissions resulting from energy use, transportation, and waste disposal. This tool helps you understand where your emissions come from and identify ways to reduce them.

10. Spread the word

Tell family and friends that energy efficiency is good for their homes and good for the environment because it lowers greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. Tell five people and together we can help our homes help us all.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Final Weekend Open House Line-up - July 25th, 2014

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Donna Antonucci Hoboken Open Houses Jersey City open houses

Check each Friday for the full list.  We will continue to post the Open House Map on Wednesday with which ever open house information is available at that time.  Thursday and Friday we add more from realtor email blasts and by combing over 40 sites.

Looking to sell?  Would you like to know what your property is worth?  Go to www.propertyvalue.cc to find out.


20 2ND ST (UNIT 805)MLS #140009909CITYJERSEY CITYBEDROOMS1 BEDROOMSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/26 12:00 TO 07/26 3:00
$539,888




20 2ND ST (UNIT 805)MLS #140009909CITYJERSEY CITYBEDROOMS1 BEDROOMSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/27 12:00 TO 07/27 3:00
$539,888




830 MONROE ST (UNIT 3D)MLS #140009131CITYHOBOKENBEDROOMS2 BEDROOMSSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/26 1:00 TO 07/26 3:00
$649,000




830 MONROE ST (UNIT 3D)MLS #140009131CITYHOBOKENBEDROOMS2 BEDROOMSSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/27 1:00 TO 07/27 3:00
$649,000




1100 ADAMS ST (UNIT 315)MLS #140009366CITYHOBOKENBEDROOMS2 BEDROOMSSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/26 1:00 TO 07/26 4:00
$765,000




1100 ADAMS ST (UNIT 315)MLS #140009366CITYHOBOKENBEDROOMS2 BEDROOMSSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/27 1:00 TO 07/27 4:00
$765,000




204 6TH ST (UNIT 4L)MLS #140006008CITYJERSEY CITYBEDROOMS1 BEDROOMSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/26 1:00 TO 07/26 5:00
$339,000




204 6TH ST (UNIT 4L)MLS #140006008CITYJERSEY CITYBEDROOMS1 BEDROOMSTATUSOPEN HOUSE!
07/27 1:00 TO 07/27 5:00
$339,000







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Donna Antonucci
Donna Antonucci
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