Thursday, September 30, 2010

The Weekly Stats are in!! From Hoboken Real Estate Monitor

Did you know that when you sign up for the private view of Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Weekly statistics you get links by quadrant to all the new and  active listings for the week. They are the Hudson county Multiple Listing Service listings used by realtors which have more information than what's available on typical property search sites.

Sign up today by clicking on any of the links & submitting your email address.  An auto-email will be sent to you with a link to the private view of the statistics. Be sure to sign up for weekly updates and get the stats and the private view of the map each week.

Click here for this weeks statistics.

Use the weekly statistics to track the market.  Bid on your new home with confidence!

See the price per square foot by neighborhood, by the number of bedrooms.  What have units sold for?  What are they listed for today?

Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/














Weekly Stats Public 2009  

 

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The Interactive Open House & New Listings Map from Hoboken Real Estate Monitor.com



We now have listings for For Sale by Owner and Non-Internet listings in the private view of the map.  Sign up today and get the most complete, easy to use open house and new listings map covering both Hoboken and downtown Jersey City. If you get a listing on the private view that lacks a link look on the right for the For Sale By Owner and Non-Internet Listings icon.  We will be integrating this over the next week or so.

Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Open House Map

Walk around Hoboken on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, looking at real estate. Get an idea of what your dollar can buy, in what part of town, with what amenity level. The map is refreshed through Thursday afternoon so be sure to stop by again before your weekend search. Sort by price, number of bedrooms or day of week! By subscribing, you will be able to not only get the basics - price, number of bedrooms, and street location but will get the unit number, and the full Multiple Listing Service listing with photos, square footage and more. . . .

Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Can seller financing be the incentive you need to get your house sold?

In seller financing, the seller functions as a direct lender, with the buyer making monthly mortgage payments to the seller instead of a bank.

Buyers who accept seller financing usually cannot qualify for a traditional mortgage loan, often because they have a low credit score.

"For sellers, the biggest benefit is to increase the pool of potential buyers to include those who might not qualify for a loan," says Ardina Franssen, RealEstate.com agent for the Atlanta and Lake Lanier region in Georgia.

Because borrowers with this profile are considered riskier, sellers often can charge as much as 8 percent or 9 percent in interest, which is more than many other investments earn.

In addition, taxes are owed only on the amount received each year rather than on the entire sale price. This reduces any taxes that might be owed. Sellers often are able to negotiate a higher price for the home when they offer financing.

"Seller financing can be a good investment because sellers will often be able to sell at full price and will earn a high interest rate on their funds," Franssen says. "Both sides benefit because there are reduced closing costs when no lender is involved in the transaction."

Who qualifies?
Seller financing is easier to arrange when homeowners own their property without a mortgage. In 2008, about 32 percent of all American homeowners owned their homes free and clear, according to a U.S. Census American Community Survey.

Homeowners with a small mortgage may be able to pay off that mortgage with the down payment from a buyer or other funds in order to offer seller financing.

In most cases, seller financing covers the entire purchase other than the down payment because institutional lenders rarely approve financing for a partial loan, says Brandon Coppock, program director for Owner Finance Buyers in Dallas, a company that assists owners with seller financing.

"Most of the buyers we work with are using seller financing as bridge financing for a few years until they can qualify for a refinance," Coppock says. "In many cases, the buyers have had a short sale or some other singular event that damaged their credit rather than a pattern of not paying bills."

Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/


Monday, September 27, 2010

Jersey City Steeped in History.....The Apple Tree House where Washington met the Marquis de Lafayette






In the years following the Dutch  settlement of New Amsterdam on the southern end of Manhattan Island in  the mid-1620s, the settlers had interest in the lands surrounding it in  Long Island, Staten Island and present-day New Jersey. By the 1650s, by  then under the rule of Director General Peter Stuyvesant, the  Netherlands had acquired from the indigenous Native Americans, by  purchase and by warfare, a lot of territory comprising today's Jersey  City, Newark, Bayonne, and other cities just across the North (Hudson)  River from Manhattan. After a violent incident...the governor of New Netherland, Peter  Stuyvesant, issued an ordinance declaring that all settlers must  "concentrate themselves by the next spring in the form of towns,  villages, and hamlets, so that they might be more effectively protected,  maintained and defended against all assaults and attacks by the  barbarians."

Two years later, Stuyvesant  engineered the purchase of most of present-day Hudson County. For this  real estate, the Indians received: 80 fathoms of wampum, 20 fathoms of  cloth, 12 brass kettles, 1 double brass kettle, 6 guns, 2 blankets and a  barrel of strong beer.


In November 1660 a new settlement called Bergen, after a city in northern Holland, was organized.






The town was directed to be laid out by Jacques Cortelyou, the  first surveyor of New Amsterdam. It was in the form of a square, eight  hundred feet long on each side, with two cross streets meeting at right  angles in the center, where a vacant space was reserved, one hundred and  sixty feet by two hundred and twenty-five feet. These streets divided  the plot into four quarters, which were subdivided into building lots.  Along the outer side of the plot palisades were erected, with gates at  the termination of the cross streets, which were closed at night, or  when any attack of Indians was threatened. The original plan is still  preserved at Bergen Square, Academy Street and Bergen Avenue being the  intersecting cross streets, while Tuers and Idaho Avenues on the east  and west, and Newkirk and Vroom Streets on the north and south, mark the  line of the palisades.

The plan survives today in the middle of modern Jersey City, just  south of Journal Square. The street at the north end is now Newkirk  Street; in the center, Academy; on the south, Vroom; and on the west,  Van Reypen; in the center, Bergen Avenue; and on the east, Tuers Avenue.  Even the wide square in the center where Bergen meets Academy is still  there, as buildings are set back in the street on all sides.  

Gravesend,  in southern Brooklyn, is similarly laid out, but Gravesend was  originally settled by a Britisher seeking religious freedom, Deborah  Moody.


Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/









Bergen Square: A Walking Tour Presented by the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy and St. Peter's Preparatory School

Old Bergen Church
Old Bergen Church



I

I.  INTRODUCTION

Hudson's Arrival

In the early 1600s the Dutch were not particularly interested in exploring North America. Instead, they turned their attention to the more lucrative tropics and Asia.
In 1609 an Englishman named Henry Hudson was hired by the Dutch to find a passage through North America to Asia. Unable to find the fabled "Northwest Passage" Hudson did report the discovery of a wide harbor surrounded by pleasant land.

New Netherland

Recognizing the value of Manhattan Island and the surrounding region, the Dutch quickly claimed all the land between the Delaware and Connecticut Rivers as "New Netherland".
Slowly the Dutch began to build settlements in their new territory, most importantly, New Amsterdam at the tip of Manhattan Island. There were a number of attempts to build a permanent settlement in present-day New Jersey, but each failed for a variety of reasons ­ hostility from the Indians, Dutch disorganization and the relatively small number of settlers. For example, in 1633 a trading post was set up by Michael Paulus, an agent of the Dutch West Indies Company, at "Aressick" on the Hudson River ­ today's Paulus Hook.

Although the Dutch generally sought to purchase Indian land, there was considerable violence between both sides. In 1656 after a particularly violent episode (caused when an Indian girl was killed in Manhattan after attempting to eat a peach from an orchard) led to all the scattered Dutch settlers living on the west side of the Hudson to flee to New Amsterdam, the governor of New Netherland, Peter Stuyvesant, issued an ordinance declaring that all settlers must "concentrate themselves by the next spring in the form of towns, villages, and hamlets, so that they might be more effectively protected, maintained and defended against all assaults and attacks by the barbarians."

Two years later, Stuyvesant engineered the purchase of most of present-day Hudson County. For this real estate, the Indians received: 80 fathoms of wampum, 20 fathoms of cloth, 12 brass kettles, 1 double brass kettle, 6 guns, 2 blankets and _ barrel of strong beer.

Bergen

In November of 1660, several families led by Tilman Van Vleck received permission for the creation of a new settlement called Bergen "in the new maize land." Jacques Cortelyou surveyed the land and planned a central square and four surrounding blocks. This was the first example in America of the design later known as the "Philadelphia Square."

There has been some speculation about the name "Bergen". There may have been Danes and Norwegians among the earliest settlers leading some to suggest that Bergen refers to the city in Norway or perhaps Bergen op Zoom in Holland. However, most authorities believe the word for "hill" or "mountain" is the likely source for a settlement built on a ridge.

In any event, most historians consider Bergen the first permanent European settlement in New Jersey, although Communipaw down the road came close ­ later in 1660 farmers formed a small village there.
The Dutch lost control of New Netherland in 1664, yet the Dutch and their descendants retained a distinct identity well into the 19th century.



Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/







Do you know that Jersey City has a house built in 1740? Where is it exactly?



When traveling on Palisade Avenue, between South and Bowers Streets, just north of the park, one's attention is riveted by a structure that appears to be a relic from some remote age. The archaic design of the old house is in sharp contrast to the surrounding multifamily buildings and the more usual single-family homes. The object of curiosity is a small museumpiece set in the midst of a very conventional city block. The farmhouse consists of two stories, a peaked roof, a facade of bluestone, a quaint portico that and -- at the southern part of the building -- there is a one-story addition that is in keeping with the original architecture. English ivy and white trim serve as beautiful highlights. 

Closer inspection reveals a metal plate that reads "1740." Could this date be true? If so, then -- above and beyond the simple beauty and sturdy construction -- we must marvel at having the good fortune to view Jersey City's oldest house, dating from well before the American Revolution. Located at 531 Palisade Avenue, this is the Van Vorst farmhouse. 

Though many of the details are clouded by time, the main facts concerning the construction and ownership of the house by the Van Vorst family are known. During the Colonial era, this northern neighborhood of what is now Jersey City was part of the Township of Bergen in Bergen County. The Town of Hudson came into being on March 4, 1852 and was renamed the City of Hudson on April 11, 1855. In 1870 Hudson City consolidated with Jersey City.

The little stone house originally stood on a farm with what was known as Bergen Woods all around. The nearest road would have been Bergen Wood Road --now Summit Avenue -- running from the Five Corners. 

In 1818 Cornelius Van Vorst willed this property to his son, John. In turn, this John Van Vorst also passed the property to a son named John. 

The original Cornelius Van Vorst is believed to have arrived here in 1636. He became Superintendant of the Pavonia colony -- most of today's Hudson County. For more than two hundred fifty years, the Van Vorsts were one of the county's leading families. 

In 1859 Augusta Waugh bought the property on Palisade Avenue from the Van Vorsts. The following year Cornelius Van Vorst (a descendant of the original settler) was elected mayor of "old" Jersey City. This was then a part of what is now the Downtown section of Jersey City. A search made by Alice Larkins for the Jersey City Historic Districts Commission showed that the Van Vorst House came into the possesion of Daniel A. Tuttle and his wife seven years later.
The next owners were Emil Stahl, a prosperous importer and inventor, and his wife Elizabeth. The Stahls bought the property in 1901. On September 17, 1935 they sold it to Captain John A. Byrnes and his wife Lovina.
Emil Stahl, intrigued by the house's history, made a search of the records in Trenton, establishing 1742 as the likely date of construction.

The Gerret Gerrites tract at one time included this land. The federal survey of Hudson County historical sites report states that when General Washington met with General, the Marquis de Lafayette at "The Apple Tree House," the Van Wagnen farm home at 298 Academy Street, to encourage the Bergen farmers in provisioning the Continental troops, a number of the officers were quartered at the old Van Vorst place on what is now Palisade Ave. The troops camped on the edge of the Hill or cliff with a commanding view of the Hudson River. The survey also states that Fetze Gerritse Van Wagnen, who lived at Communipaw, married Cornelius Van Vorst April 16, 1685. 

The "Commissioner's Map" lists Cornelius's son-in-law as the owner of “two lots” set on Bergen Hill and registered prior to 1753 (the year of his death). In the “History of Hudson County” (1874) Charles H. Winfield says that John Van Vorst (son of Cornelius) was Sarah Vasher's husband. Her two sisters, Eliza, who seems to have never married, and Frances, who became the wife of Robert Gilchrist on Oct. 1, 1812. According to the Historic Houses Survey (which differs somewhat from Miss Larkins findings), it was Mr. and Mrs. Gilchrist who sold the property to the Tuttle’s in 1854. One should note that Mrs. Gilchrist (the Gilchrists were another of the original prominent Jersey City families), was the sister of Mrs. John Van Vorst.






Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/

Friday, September 24, 2010

Updated Interactive Map from Hoboken Real Estate Monitor.com - with over 30 new listings since Wednesday



We now have listings for For Sale by Owner and Non-Internet listings in the private view of the map.  Sign up today and get the most complete, easy to use open house and new listings map covering both Hoboken and downtown Jersey City. If you get a listing on the private view that lacks a link look on the right for the For Sale By Owner and Non-Internet Listings icon.  We will be integrating this over the next week or so.

Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Open House Map

Walk around Hoboken on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, looking at real estate. Get an idea of what your dollar can buy, in what part of town, with what amenity level. The map is refreshed through Thursday afternoon so be sure to stop by again before your weekend search. Sort by price, number of bedrooms or day of week! By subscribing, you will be able to not only get the basics - price, number of bedrooms, and street location but will get the unit number, and the full Multiple Listing Service listing with photos, square footage and more. . . .

Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/

Thursday, September 23, 2010

The Stats are in . . . ! From Hoboken Real Estate Monitor.com

Did you know that when you sign up for the private view of Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Weekly statistics you get links by quadrant to all the new and  active listings for the week. They are the Hudson county Multiple Listing Service listings used by realtors which have more information than what's available on typical property search sites.

Sign up today by clicking on any of the links & submitting your email address.  An auto-email will be sent to you with a link to the private view of the statistics. Be sure to sign up for weekly updates and get the stats and the private view of the map each week.

Use the weekly statistics to track the market.  Bid on your new home with confidence!

See the price per square foot by neighborhood, by the number of bedrooms.  What have units sold for?  What are they listed for today?

Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/









Weekly Stats Public 2009  

 

Controling Heating Expenses - How well does your Board Manage this, the largest line item in most building budgets


In my travels around town, I get to how buildings are run (or not run).  I am also the Board President of my Condominium Association and own and run a property management business in addition to real estate sales.  The largest line item in our budget is, generally, heat.  Here is an example of how my Association reduced our energy costs through proper building management.
 
Per our Public Offering Statement or POS, the windows in our building are not common area but part of each unit.  Therefore, the unit owner is responsible for maintenance.  How is your condo set up?  Are you responsible for your windows?  Or is the Association responsible?

We had some unit owners who replaced their windows recently with energy efficient windows that met the 2010 Energy Rebate Standard - a U factor less than .3 and SHGC factor less than .3.  Some others had replaced their windows with really cheap windows and most had not replaced their windows in 20 years.  

We also have a centralized heating system which has it's advantages and disadvantages.  On the one hand we can buy a fuel contract from a commodities trader at wholesale.  On the downside, a unit cannot control its own heat. 

This created a conflict.  In order to accommodate those with really poor windows, we had to crank the heat up in the Winter months while those with really good windows had to open their windows in the dead of winter just to make their apartments livable.  What a waste!  What could we do to get unit owners to update their windows?

We put in place a number of easily executable measures such as updating our thermostats, putting in blow-in insulation in the attics and putting in an air conditioner policy.  Despite what might be obvious to some, many residents were leaving their air conditioners in during the winter months.  An air conditioner has open panels on each side.  Basically, leaving it in during the winter months is the same as leaving your window wide open.  We put in a $150/month penalty for any unit that left their air conditioner in between October and March.   The air conditioners came out in time for Winter!

We then had an engineer look at the windows of each unit measuring heat loss using a smoke pen. 
He rated each window, no draft, moderate and severe.  He also recorded the age and material of each window.  Windows built before a certain year, pre-date the technology to meet the 2010 Energy Tax Rebate Standard.

We then went back and looked at our Therm usage over time as we put in these policies so that we could measure the impact.  We normalized the usage by looking at something called a Degree Day.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA - the government's weather people) track something called a degree day.  When the average temperature during the day is 65 degrees that's considered neutral - no heating or cooling is needed.  For every degree above 65, that's a cooling degree day for that given day.  And for every degree below 65 on a given day, that's a heating degree day.  For example, in a week, if the average temperature was:  65, 67, 50, 55, 60, 58, 65.  The heating days would be:  0, -2, 15, 10, 5, 7 and 0 for a total of 35.  So, you can figure out how many heating degree days they are in a given winter month and use this number as an index to normalize your usage given how cold the winter is.  I thought that was a pretty neat concept.

See the full analysis below.  It basically allowed us to quantify just how much poor windows were costing us.  This was important to show that a private element could negatively impact the Association.  This due diligence gave us the means to put in a resolution that required all unit owners to meet a specific standard within a given period.  We chose the 2010 Energy Tax Rebate Standard of a U factor of the window of .3 or less and an SHGC factor of .3 or less. 

We properly noticed the meeting under the Sunshine Laws, assembled a quorum, employed a lawyer to help us write a resolution that left no out.  The resolution passed unanimously. 

The majority of the unit owners have already replaced their windows.  We have a couple of landlords in the building who are subject to rent control.  Some of these tenants are paying less than the monthly taxes.  It's unfortunate but we had to put through a very formal, properly executed resolution so that we could enforce it for the sake of the Association as a whole.  Does your board and property manager know how to do this?  Most don't.

Is your Association run well?  Do you have regular meetings?  Is your building making capital improvements every year?  Do you have a solid reserve account?  If you have any questions about how a Board is suppose to run or if you are unsatisfied with your property manager, call me - 201-240-6832.  I would be happy to help.
  Window Resolution f                                                            


Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Open House & New Listings Map from Hoboken Real Estate Monitor.com



We now have listings for For Sale by Owner and Non-Internet listings in the private view of the map.  Sign up today and get the most complete, easy to use open house and new listings map covering both Hoboken and downtown Jersey City. If you get a listing on the private view that lacks a link look on the right for the For Sale By Owner and Non-Internet Listings icon.  We will be integrating this over the next week or so.

Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Open House Map

Walk around Hoboken on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, looking at real estate. Get an idea of what your dollar can buy, in what part of town, with what amenity level. The map is refreshed through Thursday afternoon so be sure to stop by again before your weekend search. Sort by price, number of bedrooms or day of week! By subscribing, you will be able to not only get the basics - price, number of bedrooms, and street location but will get the unit number, and the full Multiple Listing Service listing with photos, square footage and more. . . .

Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/
http://www.donnaantonucci.com/

Monday, September 20, 2010

How to Figure out if Condo Fees are Appropriate for a Particular Building.



When looking at a condo especially in Hoboken, you need to consider whether or not the condominium associations has strong 'financials'.  What does this mean?

Does the building have appropriate maintenance dues to cover the cost it the associations annual budget?  In any budget there are expenses that occur every month or every season, commonly referred to as normal operating expenses and then there are long term costs such as a new roof or new water main line.  These expenses that occur every few years are typically called capital expenditures.  When assessing whether or not an association is appropriately funded, you need to take into account whether or not it is appropriately saving for these longer term, 'every once in a while' expenses.  The building should also just have some ready savings around for the unexpected e.g., a tree that falls on the building in a storm. 

To figure out how much a condo has to pay in maintenance and to assess if it and the reserve amounts are enough to be considered in good standing, take the budget and divided by the total square footage of the units in total and then multiple by the square footage of the unit you are considering divided by 12 to get the monthly rate.

Look at the budget.  Are they just allocating operating expenses are is there any estimate for upcoming capital expenses?  

The amount of maintenance dues will vary with the building's amenity level.  If there are employees dedicated to the building such as full time supers or concierge or if there is an elevator or other like a pool the operating budget will be higher per square foot.   Elevators, pools and employees push the cost up significantly due to the need to bring in skilled maintenance people, insurance and employee benefit costs. 

Another big factor to consider when evaluating the condition of the financials is the condition of the building.  Has the building been kept up? Or are there many capital expenditures coming?  A new roof for a 25 foot wide, 75 foot deep tenament building is in the $6-8K range.  A new watermain can cost about $10K.  Repointing the building is another expensive cost.  Are the windows the responsibility of the individual owner or the association?  So, it's important to know when these common element items were last updated.  Your inspector will help you evaluate the effective age of these items and your real estate agent can help you with looking at the financials.

Hoboken real estate has a mix of old and new properties.  When buying a unit in an older building, you should expect more maintenance projects.  You should also expect that the condo association has been saving for them all along.  Newer Hoboken real estate developments may have more services that push up the maintenance per square foot. 

Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/


What can a Basement Tell You about Condo Financials?




As a realtor, I get to go see many buildings, how people decorate, how they live.  One thing that I think has been really interesting is what a basement often says about the building (yes, when you are in real estate these odd things interest you).  I have found anecdotaly, there seems to be a correlation between what the basement looks like and the financial standing of the Condo Association.

Here is a basement where clearly unwanted belongings were left to die.  Some of them, like the table look rather "kitchy" but left unwanted in the basement it takes up space, creates a hazard and makes it difficult to see issues with the plumbing and other fixtures in the basement.




Often, residents leave items like this in the basement because they do not want to incur the expense or inconvenience of having them carted or selling the item.  Clutter like this doesn't happen overnight.  The Board should really have had it cleaned up but often times, especially in smaller condos, there really isn't anyone at the helm.

Owners often want to blame the property manager but really the Board runs the building.  Typically when an Association is first established, they hire a property manager who is given direction via the contract between the Association and the Property Manager.  A good contract will outline what the property manager is responsible for doing, e.g., collecting, depositing and accounting for monthly maintenance fees, seeing that the building is cleaned weekly, taking care of emergency repairs to common areas, etc.  A property manager cannot just decide by itself to spend Association resources unless it's set up in advance.  A board member needs to notice something like this, meet with the board and set policy authorizing the property manager to discard abandoned items, only allow specific items for basement storage or what ever policy the Board sees fit for common area usage.

Here is a sign from a well managed condo that stipulates just what can be left in the basement.  Look how neat it is otherwise.






How does this relate to finances?  A cluttered, messy basement is a visible sign that the Association/Board is not engaged in managing the building.

Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/



Saturday, September 18, 2010

See you on Sunday!! Open House, 1125 Maxwell Ln, 216, 2Bd, 2Bth, $899,999, corner unit




Come and say hello!  I am doing an open house on Sunday at Maxwell Place -  1125 Maxwell Lane, unit 216 from 12 - 3.  I would be happy to give you a tour of this unit or answer your questions about the market.

$899,000, 1581 Square Feet


2 Bed, 2 Bath, Corner Unit with deeded parking.
1581 Square feet, open plan living room/dining room, cherry hardwood  floors, custom cherry cabinets, stainless steel appliances, granite  counters, $14,000 in Hunter Douglas custom blinds, balcony, deeded  parking.




Master Bedroom with private balcony





Double sinks, shower and large soaking tub in the master bath.









2nd Bedroom - California closets throughout.

Entrance






Community Room


Pool with panoramic views




Maxwell Park - across the street from the east side of the development



Elysian Park - At the entrance of the development at Hudson St.



Sinatra Park on the Waterfront






Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832 cell 
201-216-0909 office
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Weekly Marketplace Stats from Hoboken Real Estate Monitor.com

Did you know that when you sign up for the private view of Hoboken Real Estate Monitor's Weekly statistics you get links by quadrant to all the new and active listings?  And, it's the MLS listing which has more information than what's available on property search sites.

Sign up today by clicking on any of the links and submitting your email address.  An auto-email will be sent to you with a link to the private view of the statistics.  Be sure to sign up for weekly updates and get the stats and the private view of the map each week.

Click here for this week's stats.

Use the weekly statistics to track the market.  Bid on your new home with confidence!
See the price per square foot by neighborhood, by the number of bedrooms.  What have units sold for?  What are they listed for today?

Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832

donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/









Weekly Stats Public 2009  

 

Western Edge Re-development



The political blogs have covered the public meetings but primarily covered the political reaction.  Below is a review of the plan, it's objectives and how the plan meets those objectives....

Redevelopment Plan Goals and Objectives

The following is a summary of the key Redevelopment Plan goals and objectives, based on the recommendations in the City's Master Plan and public comments.

  1. Increase in the economic base of the Redevelopment Area and the entire City by providing for new retail and office employment opportunities within the redevelopment area.
  2. Replace an unpleasant and uninviting streetscape with a safe, vital, pedestrian-friendly streetscape.
  3. Provide for a significant amount of open space, recreation amenities, and a new community center, that are accessible to the residents of the City of Hoboken.
  4. Provide for expanded retail and office uses to serve the needs of the growing resident population in the northwestern portion of the City.
  5. Provide affordable office space (incubator space) to support existing businesses within the City and create opportunities for new and emerging industries.
  6. Provide for landscaped rooftops/decks or green roofs that can benefit the environment and serve as an open space amenity for project residents.
  7. Create a portion of a multi-use recreation/walking path or green circuit around the City adjacent to the light rail tracks.
  8. Take advantage of the light rail by encouraging mixed-use development, open space, and pedestrian-friendly uses around the transit station consistent with smart growth planning principles.
  9. Provide for a variety of housing types, including both market-rate and affordable housing which complements and expands the housing options and choices in the City.
  10. Preserve view corridors to the Palisades through strategic placement of open space areas and building breaks.
  11. Create a walkable, human-scaled community that integrates new development with surrounding residential areas and provides connections to the 9th Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail (HBLR) station, including greenways and pedestrian linkages.
  12. Establish more varied site and building design standards that foster a visually pleasing streetscape and high-quality building design within the Redevelopment Area.

Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Weichert Realtors
201-240-6832
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.propertyvalue.cc




Click here to get a property valuation today!


The Redevelopment Area is surrounded by a mix of uses, including multi-family residential to the south, the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail (HBLR) right-of-way to the west (marking the municipal boundary), industrial uses to the north, and public, industrial, commercial, and multi-family residential uses to the east. Map 3 illustrates the variety of land uses surrounding the redevelopment area.

While the City of Hoboken has experienced a development boom in the last two decades, the northwestern portion of the City is one of the few areas of Hoboken that still contains parcels which are remnants of its industrial past. The area, however, has also experienced heightened construction activity in recent years, especially in response to the adoption of the Northwest Redevelopment Plan.

Most of the new construction has been either residential or commercial, providing new housing options and choices within the City. The development that has occurred in response to the Northwest Redevelopment Plan represents the largest new residential development that has been built in the area in recent years.

South and east of the Redevelopment Area are several multi-family residential buildings that have been recently constructed in connection with the Northwest Redevelopment Plan, as well as commercial development that includes a ShopRite grocery store. The Northwest Redevelopment Plan Area wraps around the study area to the east and south and consists of all or parts of 22 tax blocks, of which four directly abut study area properties on Ninth Street, Monroe Street, and Jefferson Street.

Further to the north is an active industrial and warehousing area, a large part of which is occupied by Academy Bus, which is essentially cut off from the Redevelopment Area properties south of Fourteenth Street by the viaduct infrastructure. To the west lie the Palisades cliffs, the municipal boundary with Union City and the right of way for the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail. The light rail runs along the western boundary of the study area. The Ninth Street light rail station is located at the westernmost end of Ninth Street, which is at the southwesterly edge of the Redevelopment Area.

Public Outreach

This plan addresses not only the recommendations in the City's 2004 Master Plan, but also the concerns of the residents. Public workshop sessions concerning the Western Edge Redevelopment Plan were held on February 13, 2008 and June 25, 2008. Major issues identified through this process include the following:

Land Use

  1. Require large commercial and/or office use components because this area of the City needs stronger, larger, more identifiable retail spaces.
  2. Provide a greater variety of unit sizes, including a percentage of three-bedroom units, to accommodate the growing population of families in Hoboken.
  3. Maintain the 5-6 story building heights that are consistent with other residential buildings in the area.
  4. Provide affordable housing.
Design

  1. Protect important views of the Palisades.
  2. Reinforce the streetscape with stoops, stairs and stores, not cars.
  3. Include guidelines that provide for excellence in design; not monolithic superstructures, but rather individual, smaller buildings such as Liberty Harbor North in Jersey City.
  4. Encourage sustainable development, including green building design requirements.
Open Space and Recreation

  1. Create large parks. Columbus Park is the nearest park, and with the number of residential units being built in the west side of the City, the need for more parks and open space is critical.
  2. Construction of the green circuit is not sufficient for open space in this area. Provide larger open space areas for active recreation.
  3. Locate the green circuit in front of buildings and integrated into the streetscape, not in the back of buildings where the lack of light, accessibility and safety are issues.
  4. Construct a community pool and recreation center.
Circulation and Parking
  1. Preserve and maintain streets with existing Belgian blocks bases to provide a visual, aesthetic reference to the City's history.
  2. Require new streetscape design, including traffic calming.
  3. Re-examine parking ratios to reduce the visual predominance of parking garages and parking lots because the area is well-served by public transportation.
  4. Design the green circuit for recreation, pedestrian and bicycle commuting.

Western Edge Redevelopment Plan Revised Draft


Relationship to Intent and Purpose of the 2004 Master Plan

New Jersey’s redevelopment statute requires that “all provisions of the Redevelopment Plan shall be either substantially consistent with the municipal master plan or designed to effectuate the master plan.” The Western Edge Redevelopment Plan is written to incorporate the major goals, objectives and concepts of the Master Plan. The Plan is substantially consistent with and designed to effectuate the City’s Master Plan, the last comprehensive version of which was adopted in April 2004. Specifically, this Redevelopment Plan complies with the intent of the Master Plan with respect to the following general goals and objectives:
  • Amplify Hoboken’s sense of community, encompassing its social diversity.
  • Enhance Hoboken’s unique setting as an urban enclave facing New York Harbor.
  • Improve the appearance of Hoboken’s streets.
  • Enhance its walk ability and pedestrian amenities.
  • Contemporize its community facilities.
  • Provide additional open space and recreation facilities.
Land Use Element

The Redevelopment Area is entirely located within the IT Industrial Transition zone in the Land Use Plan of the Master Plan. By designating the area in the Industrial Transition (IT) zone on the future land use map, the Master Plan recognized that this portion of Hoboken was in the process of transformation. The Plan states that limited industrial uses will continue to be permitted in these areas. It recommends permitted uses, including public facilities and office development. The Master Plan only provides for residential use as a conditional use by stating that residential uses “be permitted only as a conditional use in accordance with specific requirements.” These requirements include being located adjacent to public parks, or by providing open space that is dedicated to the City. Building heights and densities could also be increased in return for the provision of public amenities.
Important planning considerations in the Land Use Element that apply to the redevelopment plan include the following:
  • Promote and enhance Hoboken’s historic character and design image.
  • Continue to promote a pedestrian-friendly environment.
  • Maintain an appropriate mix of uses.
  • Enhance physical and visual connections between the waterfront and the rest of the City; and between the Palisades and City.
  • Coordinate development decisions with adjacent municipalities and Hudson County.
  • Work with institutions to ensure that any future growth is appropriate in terms of location, scale and design.
  • Promote compatibility in scale, density, design, and orientation between new and existing development.
  • Require buildings to be oriented to the street.
  • Continue to promote stoops (and stoop life).
  • Continue to hide parking on the ground level of buildings.
  • Enact “green architecture” requirements for new construction.
  • Enact “quality housing” model design guidelines for new construction.
  • Provide additional street trees.
  • Prohibit new surface parking lots or other open parking areas.
  • Restrict new curb cuts.
Westside/Northwest Redevelopment Area

The Northwest Area Concept Plan in the Master Plan designates the Madison Street Subarea as “Residential with Ground Floor Commercial” uses and the Jefferson Street Subarea is designated as “Existing/Possible Public School.” The language which accompanies the Northwest Area Concept Plan states that Hoboken is in need of additional open space and community facilities and recommends that new development contribute to the creation of these elements in order to help create a more balanced neighborhood context.
  • Provide additional open space and community facilities as other development occurs. To the greatest extent possible, new development should contribute to the provision of these elements.
  • Improve the area underneath the Fourteenth Street Viaduct. The area underneath the viaduct has the potential to serve as open space and/or a unifying feature for this section of the City.
Open Space, Recreation and Conservation Element

The Open Space, Recreation and Conservation Element in the 2004 Master Plan proposes a new park adjacent to the redevelopment area on the Cognis (formerly Henkel) factory site located between Twelfth, Thirteenth, Adams, and Madison Streets. In addition, the Open Space Plan identifies the need for a new community pool and additional recreational facilities that would be available to the general public. Finally, the Open Space Concept Plan identifies two of the Redevelopment Area parcels for planned or possible new parks and recreation: 900-912 Monroe Street and 914-930 Monroe Street. Other recommendations in the Master Plan that are applicable to the Redevelopment Plan include the following:
  • Create a green circuit in the City to link recreational and other amenities (creating a multi-use path around Hoboken’s periphery).
  • Maximize park and recreation opportunities for residents.
  • Involve the private sector in creating open space.
  • Create park corridors or “green streets.”
  • Require street trees as part of development applications.
  • Provide more recreation and parks through better utilization of land.
Economic Element

The Economic Element places the southern two blocks in the “Transit-Oriented Business District” which are districts located adjacent to light rail stations. These areas are described as “appropriate locations for commercial development” and “logical places for small business districts to be created.” In addition, the Master Plan encourages additional office space in appropriate locations. The land use mix in Hoboken is currently skewed towards residential and other non-commercial uses. Even with the recent growth in office space, it appears the office market in the Hoboken area can accommodate additional space. The mix of spaces should include larger, "prime" office space around Hoboken Terminal, as well as smaller scale offices around light rail stations and in other commercial areas. The Master Plan also encourages a mix of uses in new developments to provide supporting services to workers and residents, since housing and offices alone do not make a city. Retail space and services are an integral part of a community that has not been included in many new development projects, and the City should encourage a mix of uses in new development. The Economic Element includes the following specific recommendations that are applicable to the Western Edge Redevelopment Plan:
  • Encourage a mix of uses in new developments to provide supporting services to workers and residents.
  • Promote convenient retail at the new light rail transit stops.
  • Create opportunities for more gathering places.
Community Facilities Element

Important planning concepts in the Community Facilities Element that are applicable to the Western Edge Redevelopment Plan include the following:
  • Encourage environmentally sensitive and sustainable design.
  • Promote the improvement of utility systems in the City.
  • Promote the creation of green roofs and parking lots.
  • Employ Quality Housing Zoning to promote even higher standards.
  • Address drainage problems in the City’s flood zones.
  • Develop a set of stormwater management policies and regulations for new development.
  • Reduce waste and promote recycling.
Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Weichert Realtors
201-240-6832
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.propertyvalue.cc



Click here to get a property valuation today!

Open House - 1125 Maxwell Lane unit 216, 9/12 12-3 - 1581 Sq Feet, Corner Unit $899,000

Donna Antonucci
Come and say hello! I am doing an open house on Sunday at Maxwell Place - 1125 Maxwell Lane, unit 216 from 12 - 3.  I would be happy to give you a tour of this unit or answer your questions about the market.

$899,000, 1581 Square Feet

Donna Antonucci
2 Bed, 2 Bath, Corner Unit with deeded parking.
1581 Square feet, open plan living room/dining room, cherry hardwood floors, custom cherry cabinets, stainless steel appliances, granite counters, $14,000 in Hunter Douglas custom blinds, balcony, deeded parking.


Donna Antonucci
Master Bedroom with private balcony


Double sinks, shower and large soaking tub in the master bath.

2nd Bedroom - California closets throughout.
Entrance



Community Room


Pool with panoramic views
Maxwell Park - across the street from the east side of the development
Elysian Park - At the entrance of the development at Hudson St.


Sinatra Park on the Waterfront


Information Provided by Donna Antonucci
Prudential Castle Point Realty
201-240-6832
donnaantonucci@gmail.com
http://www.hobokenrealestatemonitor.com/
http://www.hobokenrealestatevalue.com/